The dust has settled on Wolves’ frantic Premier League 2020/21 season.

Nuno Espirito Santo oversaw a drop off in league position to 13th but sealed survival comfortably before deciding to leave.

Here are five things we learned from a season like no other…

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A bigger squad is needed

Until 2020/21, Nuno had worked wonders with a small squad, using an excellent medical team to keep his players fresh even with a Europa League campaign to deal with.

Last term, the demands on the squad were just too great. Fatigue mounted up and Wolves’ results suffered.

The cheapest, quickest and most effective way to bulk out a squad is via the promotion of youth.

It remains to be seen whether the new manager will be someone who puts that at the forefront of his mind, but it would help Wolves avoid another season where too many players look like they’re running on empty.

Changing style isn’t easy

Nuno had established Wolves as a solid, counter attacking side before 2020/21.

But he decided that to move to the next level, Wolves had to become more dominant and proactive.

That transition – including a switch to a back four – was bumpy and painful. It was also not complete by the time of his departure.

 

A manager with brand new beliefs might be better at overseeing the shift than Nuno but it will not be easy at all.

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Jota was a big miss

While Wolves struggled for creativity and invention, Diogo Jota took to life at Anfield in no time at all.

With Raul Jimenez out injured, Jota would have been the main man at Molineux.

That could have made for a very different season. His replacement, Fabio Silva, may well turn out to be a top player but he isn’t ready yet.

The squad needs a shakeup

Even the best and most successful sides evolve their squads every season to keep things fresh.

It brings new ideas and ambitions to the club and Wolves could do with a shakeup in the summer.

One issue is it seems the club will largely need to sell to buy. Another is that the European Championship will mean deals are harder to do and take longer.

They might have to wait until after the tournament. The delay in appointing a manager means recruitment will be delayed too.

It won’t be easy to get but Wolves need new blood of the right quality.

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Wolves are established in top flight

Wolves had a lot of obstacles to face last season and yet their Premier League status was never really in doubt.

That can’t be understated. Wolves are established in the top flight.

The next step is to push again to get into Europe, but Wolves’ project needs the stability of top flight football and they can get that even when they’re nowhere near their best.

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